photo by David Becker for Getty Images

Stephen Paddock had his fifteen minutes of infamy.

A millionaire gambler who appeared to have it all made the decision to play judge, jury and executioner for a group of people he didn’t know.

What goes through the mind of someone who instigates the deadliest mass shooting in US history? What does it take to fire on a crowd of unknown people focused on enjoying a concert, murdering 58, injuring 527 before turning the gun on himself?

Nobody will know what Paddock was thinking before he let loose that barrage of bullets. Why he thought this was the right thing to do in this place at this time. It’s known he’d been there three days and had an arsenal of weapons that implied a desire to cause a lot of hurt and pain.

This is not a political issue. To politicize it takes away the value and dignity of those killed and hurt. It diminishes the courage shown by those who heroically threw themselves over friends and stepped in to help people to safety. Everyone of them has a story of significance.

To deal with this as anything less than a tragedy is wrong. It minimizes our humanity.

We can’t change what’s happened. Analyzing the minutia on the public stage turns it into a momentary horror. A second of sadness. Then most of us move on.

This is not about gun control. Those who want to hurt others and use a firearm to do it will find a way to get a gun. Laws won’t stop people bent on evil.

Evil does exist in the world.

The question of what to do about gun violence has been around for years. Some folks demonize the NRA while others whole-heartedly support them. There are those who believe we need freedom from easy gun accessibility and others who say we need freedom to bear arms to protect ourselves.

Those aren’t the issues. The truth is freedom without virtue and compassion is chaos.

A former vice president and senior counsel for CBS was fired after an inappropriate Facebook post where she commented about those attending the country music concert were probably gun-toting Republicans for whom she had no sympathy.

Did she really not care about the dead? Was she really so calloused toward people she didn’t know? Her apology was heart-felt, but what she’d done was practice free speech.

Without virtue or compassion.

If I want to change my world, I need to begin with me. Treating others with kindness, recognizing their value and seeing them for who they are.

The Bible calls it the Golden Rule. Jesus said to treat others as we want to be treated. Which means putting actions to our words and not just talking to get those golden sound bytes for social media.

It’s a great goal, but we can’t do it ourselves. All the laws and self-help books in the world can’t give us what we need to be kind and care for all people–friends and enemies alike.

It takes heart transformation, which only Jesus can provide.

Washington can’t save us. No matter who’s in the top seat.

 

 

 

 

4 responses »

  1. Rob says:

    Great article Dayle, and very insightful. I would like to point out one detail . Our brave men and women in Blue stormed that mad man’s room not knowing what kind of burrage they would face on the other side of that door, little did they know, he had a camera on them, but stormed the door they did, and they got him, before he got them and before he could end himself.
    Keep up your great work. your an amazing writer. I am not.

    Love
    Rob

    • daylerogers says:

      Thanks for the insight, Rob. They were heroes working above and beyond as well, doing their jobs without concern for their well-being. I would never want to not give credit where credit is due–I so appreciate you bringing this up. Your kindness is valued more than you know.

  2. This is a fresh and quite meaningful take on the issue. While gun-control could make a difference on some level, making grass root changes sure is the answer. So many issues out there like bullying, depression, suicides can be traced back to an impatient society that is so obsessed with superficial pride, that it forgets the most important thing – to be kind. Imagine the lives we could all save if we placed humanity first, in our own lives on a daily basis.

    • daylerogers says:

      You speak words of wisdom and truth–the world would be better if we could all be selfless and kind. Laws really help us see how we can’t keep them–if they make more laws to prevent folks from owning guns, those who really want them would still find a way to get them. Laws don’t make us better. Only God can do that. Thanks for your encouraging words, my friend.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s