I wish I had a hat head.

I don’t. It’s rather large, as heads go, and I look foolish wearing them. My kids and the grands, on the other hand, look…well, grand in hats.

As a child, my sisters and I used to get cute hats for Easter. We’d parade around like we were on the runway. Growing up in Chicago, it snowed frequently on that Sunday. Easter hats and heavy coats didn’t make a great fashion statement.

We thought we looked fabulous.

Winter was always the time for funky caps for protecting heads and ears. When it got cold enough, even Dad wore a fedora. It made him look a little like a movie star. Or mobster.

Living in the Sunshine State, I wear baseball caps to keep the sun off my face. Purely utilitarian–shade for my eyes, protection from skin cancer.

Heather and I were at our town center with Sydney and Isley–two ends of the fashion spectrum. Isley is all about putting outfits together, color coordinating and looking glamorous. Syd’s value is comfort, preferably athletic shorts and shirts. Both had fun trying on hats.

 Both looked amazing.

Hats have a variety of purposes. Some make statements. Brooklyn at two is a die-hard Dodger fan and wears her hat proudly. Of course, there were no options with both parents being of the same fan base.

Others are for clear protection from the elements. Sloane has a variety of winter hats because, living in Washington DC, there’s been a plethora of snow and cold.

Huck and Landry? They just like looking cool.

I could never keep my kids in any kind of protective head ware when they were young. Winter caps, sun bonnets, little baseball caps–they were always ripped off their heads.

I wear a variety of hats in my job, though none are visual. I wear my coaching hat when I’m working with gals who are transitioning into new jobs or life phases. A mentor hat when I have the chance to encourage younger women who need a word from a more “weathered woman” about next steps as they move forward. A peer hat when I work with my team on problem solving and development.

I’ve got hats for being a wife, mom, nana, sister and friend.

The hardest hat for me to wear is the one that reflects me. Just me.

It’s not difficult for me to show up at my job and do the work I really love. Or put on the nana hat and help out with the grands. It’s totally fun to put on the wife hat, now that we’re empty nesters, and enjoy being with my husband.

But the “me” hat–that’s tricky.

I’m a people pleaser, so I can tend to look like a chameleon. Show up one way for one person who has specific expectations of me. A totally different look for someone else who doesn’t see me the same way.

Am I either?

The one Person who sees me as I really am is Jesus. Nothing hidden. All my junk and clutter exposed. He sees me and fully accepts me as I am.

No hat required.

 

 

 

 

 

One response »

  1. I love the Dayle hat, but I get why it’s hard to put it on. The other hats often feel more comfortable to me too. While being a chameleon comes with it’s own junk, don’t forget that it’s also a strong quality that allows you to connect with anyone, anywhere, anytime. 😉 It’s a good quality. I say that as a fellow chameleon 😉 Love you dear friend, hats and all. And your grands are adorable in their lids!

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