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There are many routines we do daily that never factor into the think mode.

Getting out of bed is rarely a choice. Using the facilities–we take in, we give out. Bathing–well, for most of us.

I wear contacts, having very poor vision and not liking the way I look in glasses. I also see better in my contacts. (More current prescription, maybe?) Putting them in before I do much of anything else is a given.

A few days ago, I received an unexpected result from putting my contacts in. I couldn’t see.

They began to burn. Badly. I tried to get them out, but it felt like they were stuck to my eyeballs.

Which produced a lovely vampire affect. Bloodshot eyes, dripping like little faucets had turned on beneath my pupils.7d2d77e15200ae1b3a4b506c0bac26e8

Gratefully, no elongated teeth accompanied my new look.

What was even more disconcerting was that I’d apparently burned the corneas of my eyes, and now light in any form hurt like the dickens.

Maybe I am part vampire.

For several days, I wan’t able to go outside, drive a car, be in a room with light. TV was out of the question–too bright. Even working on my computer was tough.

I wear sunglasses over my glasses to handle the brightness. Lovely.

I went to the doctor and was told it would take several days to heal, with the help of steroid drops for my eyes and pills to help my body calm down.

2013-07-27_140257_img_2733Calm down? I couldn’t do diddily squat! I was reading and weeping.

There was a brief time when I thought I’d lose my eyesight because of this. This will, most likely, not lead to that eventuality.

I’ve taken my ability to see for granted.

Walking in the shoes of those who have serious sight problems or can’t see at all has made me aware of what folks go through who don’t have the option of clear sight.

Most of us take what we have for granted. Not in an entitled way, but in living with what is our norm. Because we don’t walk well in other’s shoes, we don’t truly understand what they go through.

The women’s march pointed that out.

I was sent an article by Dina Leygerman from a friend who thinks very differently than I do. It stated that we as women have what we have today because of the choices and hard work of women who’ve fought for us in the past.

Rose Schneierman, who fought for humane working conditions.

Eleanor Roosevelt and Molly Dewson, for women to engage in politics and affect policy.

Susan B. Anthony and Alice Paul for our right to vote.

My friend is right. We do take these rights for granted.

Which is why we need to listen to each other. Really see each other, not as enemies, but as advocates. We share too much of the same thing to fight each other. That’s ineffective and inefficient.

God hears us when we come to Him. He knows listening is the beginning of redemption.

If we listen, we might begin to see.

Can you see me clearly now?

 

One response »

  1. Feels a little like deja vu… flashbacks to August when i thought I might lose my eyesight forever, when I wore 2 pair of sunglasses just to go outside, when I didn’t have a current glasses rx (still don’t like how I look in glasses, either), when I couldn’t do anything! Peas in a pod 😉 Glad it sounds like you are healing?? I like the connection here. It’s a big shift to see things from another’s vantage point. We do more to repair by listening than by yappin”… too bad I like yappin’ so much

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