My daughter Melody is a fashionista.photo-1

She was one before the word came into vogue. I think she came into this world questioning how to accessorize her newborn onesies.

She has fashion taste. I have none.

She delights in putting outfits together. I wear what’s comfortable.

She knows how to accessorize. I’m lucky to spell the word right.

She loves to shop. I abhor it.

I have, however, birthed five shoppers all with great fashion sense. All my girls delight in the “treasure hunt.” It isn’t the “I must have this or I’ll die” attitude towards shopping. It’s more the “I will keep looking even though I know I’ll never buy it but it’s sure fun to look and dream” attitude towards shopping. (My one son does share my aversion to shopping. He actually wore the same shirt five years in a row in our annual family picture. Without blinking an eye.)

When Melody is around her niece, she tries to impart her giftedness to this very teachable three-year-old. Isley will shop with her aunt because Melody makes it a spontaneous party. They try clothes on, they pick out accessories. Isley has even learned to strut in front of a mirror.

It was only a matter of time till the make-up came out. photo

“I want make-up, too.” This is the only possible response when your aunt is putting on lipstick.

So Melody accommodated her. Lipstick, eye shadow, blush.

Tots in tiaras, look out.

It isn’t our looks, however, that define us. As much as we might like it to be.

It’s our hearts.

I had a friend when I was younger who’d gotten an electrical burn on her face at an early age. No amount of plastic surgery would take away the scarring. Make-up couldn’t hide it.

It was what people noticed when they first met her. A fact she had grown to expect.

But when they gave her a moment, she led with her smile. She was the most compassionate, kind and genuine person I knew.  She cared for people well. She drew folks in with her heart. And once they knew her, the burn faded from their sight.

I want to be that person of internal beauty. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t want to look my best. I work at it! But I need to make it a point to spend energy and time grooming my heart so that I’m a better reflection of the One who created that heart.

The prophet Samuel was to crown a king for Israel. He first saw the brother of the man who would be king, and was taken by his height and royal look.

“But the Lord said to Samuel, ‘Do not consider his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. THE LORD DOES NOT LOOK AT THE THINGS MAN LOOKS AT. Man looks at the outward appearance, BUT THE LORD LOOKS AT THE HEART.'”   ! Samuel 16:7

For all that our culture spends on how we look, I think we’d benefit from spending time insuring our hearts are looking their best. Accessorize with faith, hope and love. That happens when you fill your mind with the truth of God’s Word.

You’ll never look better.

5 responses »

  1. terry morgan says:

    I like how my daughters help me with style… But I appreciate even more how they help me with my heart. This is great perspective, Dayle!

  2. I loved the phrase”grooming my heart!”

  3. JulieS says:

    Dayle, I needed this word today. Thanks for the encouragement to “accessorize with faith, hope, and love.” I feel like time in the word gives me perspective but I haven’t thought about how it affects how I am perceived… Thanks for the encouragement. Oh, and your smile is better than any accessory you could buy in the finest boutique!

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