His organizational skills amaze me. He’s orderly, precise, and his follow-through with a plan is exceptional.

He’s two and a half.

Ward has a knack for order. He loves to line up his cars and trucks, and his magnetic squares are all made with the same precision; he purposefully places them with a toy car in each. 

It’s incredible to begin to identify strengths in children, watching as their personalities and temperaments develop. Ward’s enjoyment of structure and precision could be pointing to someone who will one day be stellar at implementing plans and being the mental might behind important projects.

His sister, Sloane, is about as opposite as you can get. Outspoken and dramatic, she knows exactly what she thinks–and knows what I should be thinking as well. She’s the most decisive four-year-old I’ve ever met. She never wavers with a response. She’s self-assured and confident.

I wish I had a little more of both in me.

I have several grands that can carry on conversations with absolutely anybody about anything. Their communication skills and compassion make it easy for them to talk with strangers (in a safe environment of course) and walk away with a new friend.

Several have artistic abilities that are well beyond their years. Others are very good at problem-solving and seeing the end result before I understand the issue.

I marvel at how everyone is born with talents that often are seen in glimpses when we’re young. 

Everyone is gifted.

I used to rail at the school system who insisted on separating “gifted” students from “normal” students. As if one is better or preferred to the other. 

We are prone to attach labels to people who aren’t like us. We make assumptions based on what we see; first impressions can be deceptive and hurtful if we truly believe that’s all a person is. 

Ward wears glasses. They discovered early that he had issues with his vision and have corrected it with the cutest glasses ever. He’s also the only one in his two-year-old class who wears glasses. He’s now the spitting image of his dad.

A young boy in his class, however, focused on him because of this difference. I want to believe it wasn’t out of meanness, but he picked on Ward incessantly. Pulling his glasses off, pushing him off the playground equipment. Every day it was something. 

The problem has been dealt with, but it made me realize how we all, from a young age, tend to view those different from us as less than. Or problematic. 

We’ve all been made with equal love and passion by a God who has known us from eternity past. Each person born, no matter how they look, what their skill set, or our presumption of their quality of life, deserves to live with dignity and respect. Our differences create a tapestry of beauty that adds to who we all are.

It’s easy to label when you feel uncomfortable. Often labeling others makes us feel better rather than describing the worth of others.

I love seeing the beginnings of beauty and talent in the very young.

Every child.

God has invested that beauty into each of us.

If we just choose to see past first impressions.

4 responses »

  1. Christi says:

    Oh, I’m glad the issue was taken care of! I think one of the hardest things as a parent (or grandparent) is to learn your child is getting picked on — though maybe it would be worse to find out your child is the one being the bully!

    Like

    • daylerogers says:

      Christi, you’re so right. He was so confused by it all–he’s the most tenderhearted little guy, and this came out of nowhere. It would be WAY worse to find out your child was the bully–and that’s a completely different conversation. Thanks for your input, my friend,

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Signora Sheila says:

    God has invested that beauty into each of us. So true, Dayle. So why do often struggle so with accepting this about myself??

    Like

    • daylerogers says:

      Because the lies are so much easier to believe than the truth. We choose who we listen to–and the enemy yells loudly all the time. Thanks for your insight–it’s so true.

      Like

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