He didn’t recognize the face. Reaching out his hand, he touched another hand that looked just like his.

“It’s you, buddy. That’s your face in the mirror.”

At almost a year, Cal is interested in many things. The world has exploded with new places to explore, fascinating faces to get to know, and amazing items to stick in his mouth for further investigation.

He’s developed an attraction to mirrors. Recognizing himself and grasping the reality that the little guy in the reflection does exactly what he does. It still takes moments for recognition to click, but when it does, he embraces his image with joy and enthusiasm.

Literally. He tries to hug himself and licks or smooches his likeness.

We all do it. I glance into windows as I’m walking past to see if I’m put together the right way. I don’t tarry too long with looking–it’s too easy to find something wrong with the image. So long as I’m clothed and mostly in my right mind, I’m passable.

Kids enjoy longer gazes because everything they wear and every mood they have changes the way they look. Mirrors become a lesson in self-awareness.

Brooklyn, at three, loves dressing in pretty and pink. Wearing a princess dress, though, changes who she is. She may be a little girl, but arraying herself in a long silky pink dress transforms her into Princess Aurora; the yellow gown into Princess Belle. When she gazes at her reflection, the imagined transformation becomes real.

What she sees is a princess.

Sloane is all about drama. The faces she makes in the mirror expand her idea of who she is.

What she sees is fun.

We are mirrors of another kind. People reflect the image they want to project–it’s why we manage an image on social media. A careless picture, an inconsiderate statement not thought through, or questionable contexts make people wonder who the real you is. In a world of quick pictures and sound bytes, a peck of a finger can make or break you.

We tend to believe what we see. Rarely do we wait around for explanations if appearances seem problematic.

With kids, getting up close and personal with their reflected image is the preferred way of viewing. Mirrors get smudgy and streaked and don’t show clearly what’s before them.

That rarely bothers a child. What might appear fuzzy to us is fully seen by them.

I need to be conscious of the image I’m reflecting. Not trying to fool others into thinking I’m someone I’m not. Being authentic.

So who am I? What do I see when I look in the mirror? Not the image staring at me, but the person standing there.

My heart’s desire is to reflect the Person most important in my life.

Jesus.

I may be smudged and streaked. But He sees me as beautiful.

He alone has the power to shape who I am. To permanently and positively impact me to grow to be a better person.

What do others see in you?

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 responses »

  1. Marylgraham says:

    How much extra did it cost to have ABSOLUTELY ADORABLE GRANDBABIES!?!?!

  2. Tom Maxwell says:

    Thanks for the beautiful portrayal of what we should look like to a hurting world and often do not. Unfortunately we are up to our ears in that white stuff and could use some of your sunshine. A blessed week, 

    Captain Tom Maxwell (USN retired)

     

    United States NavalAcademy 

    Central Missouri BlueGold Officer (retired) 

    1510 Arrowhead Trail

    Boonville, MO 65233

     

    Office: 660-882-8073

    Cell:   660-537-9967

    http://www.captaintommaxwell

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